Frequent Questions

Yes, and the heating circuit should be complete (when radiators are used, all of them have to be installed). It is a closed circuit that must be fully filled with water and any remaining air must be vented. For an optimum performance, water should be pressurized from 1 to 1.2 Kg/cm2.

It is a system to control the operation of boilers by means of which, on detecting any failure, the boiler is blocked, a beeper sounds and a failure code is displayed at the control panel to identify the detected problem. For example, lack of water pressure, lack of gas, malfunctioning of blower, etc.

Yes, they need it to feed the water pump, the electronic controls and, in Forced Balanced Draft Boilers, also for the blower.

Wall Hung Boilers can also be classified according to the type vent they have for flue gases. They are Natural Draft when they use a vertical duct to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the room air. They are Forced Balanced Draft when they have two vent ducts, one to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and another to take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the outside air.

Wall Hung Boilers can be classified according to the type of service they allow. Those identified as only heating allow the service only for heating through radiators or radiant floor, and those identified as double service allow both, heating through radiators or radiant floor and water heating for domestic use.

Yes. Like any gas appliance, a periodic maintenance control is necessary. For water heaters, a monthly water drain (about 20 liters) should be made to remove the sediments deposited on the tank bottom. Water heaters are fitted with a magnesium anode to prevent corrosion of the tank. At least, once a year the anode condition should be checked and substituted if necessary.

Yes. They are available for natural gas and for LPG. On installing the appliance check that it corresponds to the type of gas you are going to use.

When using pressurizing pumps, the water volume increase produced by the temperature rise of the water in the tank must be taken into account. Many pressurizing pumps are fitted with a stop valve which will not allow such volume increase and, consequently the pressure inside the tank will become higher and may cause water leakages through the relief valve fitted in the appliance water connections. In that case, an expansion tank should be installed in the water supply between the pump and the water heater.
On the other hand, pressurizing pumps produce an important flow rate increase which may reduce the water heater capabilities. In that case, the flow rate should be reduced by adjusting the stopcock located just before the cold water inlet of the water heater.

High recovery storage water heaters have a safety system which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, for example, because of an obstruction in the chimney, this system automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room to prevent accidents due to carbon monoxide.
In our Acquapiú series of storage water heaters this system is named MXP.

In our local market all storage water heaters are of the Natural Draft type. Therefore, they must be connected to a chimney. In the case of our series Acquapiú of storage water heaters, their chimneys must end above the building top, since their input powers are above 10000 kcal/hour.

Usually, it can be substituted. But it is important to take into account that high recovery storage water heaters, because of their higher burner power, require a larger chimney diameter and an appropriate gas supply.

Recovery is a measurement of the capacity of a storage water heater to supply hot water. It stands for the volume of water that can be obtained in an hour with a temperature rise of 20°C between the input cold water and the output hot water.

Standard storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the volume of their accumulated water. Their burners have a rather low power, so their heating up times are quite long
High Recovery storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the high power of their burners, practically regardless the volume of their accumulated water. As their heating up times are actually short, their performance is similar to that of instantaneous water heaters.

Instantaneous water heaters heat up water at the time that hot water is required. For its operation it is necessary to have a water supply with an appropriate pressure.
Storage water heaters have a tank where water is kept hot and ready for the moment it is required. They have more flexibility for different water flow rates, as water temperature can be regulated at the point of use by mixing hot an cold water. They can operate even with a very low water pressure.

The U venting or vertical venting is an installation option for Direct-Vent heaters available in 3000 and 5000 kcal/h models when the heater must be installed on an internal wall. In this option, an adapting box is used to transform the original horizontal venting connections of the heater into 2 vertical 3″-diameter ducts, side by side, that must go through the roof and fitted on the outside with 2 caps that are supplied with the appliance. The maximum height of the ducts is 6 m. The flue gas duct must be 15 cm higher than inlet air duct.

It is a working mode for Direct Vent Heaters with thermostat. It is a new system that minimizes the noises produced by the combustion chamber, ensuring a quiet and safe sleep.

Heaters with thermostat have a temperature selection knob to choose the desired room temperature. In Direct-Vent heaters, the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shut off and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.
In Vent-Free heaters the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shifted to its minimum Power and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.

Yes, all of our heaters are provided with the Multigas System, i.e., the heaters are shipped to work with Natural Gas, but they are supplied with a kit for their conversions to LPG.

Direct-Vent and natural draft heaters don not produce any humidity, since their combustion gases are evacuated to the outside. They may even decrease the room relative humidity. Vent-Free heaters expel the combustion gases (including water vapor) to the room, so, in cases where there is not an appropriate permanent ventilation of the room, humidity may increase and even produce condensations.

Yes, as resins and thinners are used in their manufacture, they may be vaporized when heated up for the first time after being installed. It is recommended to provide room ventilation for about half an hour to eliminate any odor that may be produced.

Yes. Like all gas appliances, a periodic control of their working conditions and safety devices is recommended, preferably, at the beginning of the winter season.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) the MXP System which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, the MXP System automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) its ODS (Oxygen Depletion System) which, on detecting an oxygen decrease of 2 or 3% in the room air, it automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, too.

NO. All of our heaters require a minimum distance (stated in their manuals) between their bottoms and the floor. This is due to two reasons. First, to avoid high temperatures on the floor and second, as they are appliances that heat the room air by convection, they need to have an easy circulation of the air from the bottom to the upper part.

Vent-free heaters take the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air and, at the same time, they expel the combustion gases to the room. Therefore, they must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Natural Draft heaters require a chimney to draw the combustion gases toward the outside, so they also use the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air. They must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms either. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Direct-Vent heaters have a venting system that takes the air they need for combustion from the outside and, at the same time, it expels the combustion gases to the outside. Consequently, they can be installed in any kind of rooms, including bathrooms and bedrooms.

The U venting or vertical venting is an installation option for Direct-Vent heaters available in 3000 and 5000 kcal/h models when the heater must be installed on an internal wall. In this option, an adapting box is used to transform the original horizontal venting connections of the heater into 2 vertical 3″-diameter ducts, side by side, that must go through the roof and fitted on the outside with 2 caps that are supplied with the appliance. The maximum height of the ducts is 6 m. The flue gas duct must be 15 cm higher than inlet air duct.

It is a working mode for Direct Vent Heaters with thermostat. It is a new system that minimizes the noises produced by the combustion chamber, ensuring a quiet and safe sleep.

Heaters with thermostat have a temperature selection knob to choose the desired room temperature. In Direct-Vent heaters, the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shut off and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.
In Vent-Free heaters the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shifted to its minimum Power and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.

Yes, all of our heaters are provided with the Multigas System, i.e., the heaters are shipped to work with Natural Gas, but they are supplied with a kit for their conversions to LPG.

Direct-Vent and natural draft heaters don not produce any humidity, since their combustion gases are evacuated to the outside. They may even decrease the room relative humidity. Vent-Free heaters expel the combustion gases (including water vapor) to the room, so, in cases where there is not an appropriate permanent ventilation of the room, humidity may increase and even produce condensations.

Yes, as resins and thinners are used in their manufacture, they may be vaporized when heated up for the first time after being installed. It is recommended to provide room ventilation for about half an hour to eliminate any odor that may be produced.

Yes. Like all gas appliances, a periodic control of their working conditions and safety devices is recommended, preferably, at the beginning of the winter season.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) the MXP System which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, the MXP System automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) its ODS (Oxygen Depletion System) which, on detecting an oxygen decrease of 2 or 3% in the room air, it automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, too.

NO. All of our heaters require a minimum distance (stated in their manuals) between their bottoms and the floor. This is due to two reasons. First, to avoid high temperatures on the floor and second, as they are appliances that heat the room air by convection, they need to have an easy circulation of the air from the bottom to the upper part.

Vent-free heaters take the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air and, at the same time, they expel the combustion gases to the room. Therefore, they must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Natural Draft heaters require a chimney to draw the combustion gases toward the outside, so they also use the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air. They must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms either. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Direct-Vent heaters have a venting system that takes the air they need for combustion from the outside and, at the same time, it expels the combustion gases to the outside. Consequently, they can be installed in any kind of rooms, including bathrooms and bedrooms.

Yes. Like any gas appliance, a periodic maintenance control is necessary. For water heaters, a monthly water drain (about 20 liters) should be made to remove the sediments deposited on the tank bottom. Water heaters are fitted with a magnesium anode to prevent corrosion of the tank. At least, once a year the anode condition should be checked and substituted if necessary.

Yes. They are available for natural gas and for LPG. On installing the appliance check that it corresponds to the type of gas you are going to use.

When using pressurizing pumps, the water volume increase produced by the temperature rise of the water in the tank must be taken into account. Many pressurizing pumps are fitted with a stop valve which will not allow such volume increase and, consequently the pressure inside the tank will become higher and may cause water leakages through the relief valve fitted in the appliance water connections. In that case, an expansion tank should be installed in the water supply between the pump and the water heater.
On the other hand, pressurizing pumps produce an important flow rate increase which may reduce the water heater capabilities. In that case, the flow rate should be reduced by adjusting the stopcock located just before the cold water inlet of the water heater.

High recovery storage water heaters have a safety system which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, for example, because of an obstruction in the chimney, this system automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room to prevent accidents due to carbon monoxide.
In our Acquapiú series of storage water heaters this system is named MXP.

In our local market all storage water heaters are of the Natural Draft type. Therefore, they must be connected to a chimney. In the case of our series Acquapiú of storage water heaters, their chimneys must end above the building top, since their input powers are above 10000 kcal/hour.

Usually, it can be substituted. But it is important to take into account that high recovery storage water heaters, because of their higher burner power, require a larger chimney diameter and an appropriate gas supply.

Recovery is a measurement of the capacity of a storage water heater to supply hot water. It stands for the volume of water that can be obtained in an hour with a temperature rise of 20°C between the input cold water and the output hot water.

Standard storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the volume of their accumulated water. Their burners have a rather low power, so their heating up times are quite long
High Recovery storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the high power of their burners, practically regardless the volume of their accumulated water. As their heating up times are actually short, their performance is similar to that of instantaneous water heaters.

Yes, and the heating circuit should be complete (when radiators are used, all of them have to be installed). It is a closed circuit that must be fully filled with water and any remaining air must be vented. For an optimum performance, water should be pressurized from 1 to 1.2 Kg/cm2.

It is a system to control the operation of boilers by means of which, on detecting any failure, the boiler is blocked, a beeper sounds and a failure code is displayed at the control panel to identify the detected problem. For example, lack of water pressure, lack of gas, malfunctioning of blower, etc.

Yes, they need it to feed the water pump, the electronic controls and, in Forced Balanced Draft Boilers, also for the blower.

Wall Hung Boilers can also be classified according to the type vent they have for flue gases. They are Natural Draft when they use a vertical duct to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the room air. They are Forced Balanced Draft when they have two vent ducts, one to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and another to take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the outside air.

Wall Hung Boilers can be classified according to the type of service they allow. Those identified as only heating allow the service only for heating through radiators or radiant floor, and those identified as double service allow both, heating through radiators or radiant floor and water heating for domestic use.

+ All

Yes, and the heating circuit should be complete (when radiators are used, all of them have to be installed). It is a closed circuit that must be fully filled with water and any remaining air must be vented. For an optimum performance, water should be pressurized from 1 to 1.2 Kg/cm2.

It is a system to control the operation of boilers by means of which, on detecting any failure, the boiler is blocked, a beeper sounds and a failure code is displayed at the control panel to identify the detected problem. For example, lack of water pressure, lack of gas, malfunctioning of blower, etc.

Yes, they need it to feed the water pump, the electronic controls and, in Forced Balanced Draft Boilers, also for the blower.

Wall Hung Boilers can also be classified according to the type vent they have for flue gases. They are Natural Draft when they use a vertical duct to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the room air. They are Forced Balanced Draft when they have two vent ducts, one to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and another to take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the outside air.

Wall Hung Boilers can be classified according to the type of service they allow. Those identified as only heating allow the service only for heating through radiators or radiant floor, and those identified as double service allow both, heating through radiators or radiant floor and water heating for domestic use.

Yes. Like any gas appliance, a periodic maintenance control is necessary. For water heaters, a monthly water drain (about 20 liters) should be made to remove the sediments deposited on the tank bottom. Water heaters are fitted with a magnesium anode to prevent corrosion of the tank. At least, once a year the anode condition should be checked and substituted if necessary.

Yes. They are available for natural gas and for LPG. On installing the appliance check that it corresponds to the type of gas you are going to use.

When using pressurizing pumps, the water volume increase produced by the temperature rise of the water in the tank must be taken into account. Many pressurizing pumps are fitted with a stop valve which will not allow such volume increase and, consequently the pressure inside the tank will become higher and may cause water leakages through the relief valve fitted in the appliance water connections. In that case, an expansion tank should be installed in the water supply between the pump and the water heater.
On the other hand, pressurizing pumps produce an important flow rate increase which may reduce the water heater capabilities. In that case, the flow rate should be reduced by adjusting the stopcock located just before the cold water inlet of the water heater.

High recovery storage water heaters have a safety system which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, for example, because of an obstruction in the chimney, this system automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room to prevent accidents due to carbon monoxide.
In our Acquapiú series of storage water heaters this system is named MXP.

In our local market all storage water heaters are of the Natural Draft type. Therefore, they must be connected to a chimney. In the case of our series Acquapiú of storage water heaters, their chimneys must end above the building top, since their input powers are above 10000 kcal/hour.

Usually, it can be substituted. But it is important to take into account that high recovery storage water heaters, because of their higher burner power, require a larger chimney diameter and an appropriate gas supply.

Recovery is a measurement of the capacity of a storage water heater to supply hot water. It stands for the volume of water that can be obtained in an hour with a temperature rise of 20°C between the input cold water and the output hot water.

Standard storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the volume of their accumulated water. Their burners have a rather low power, so their heating up times are quite long
High Recovery storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the high power of their burners, practically regardless the volume of their accumulated water. As their heating up times are actually short, their performance is similar to that of instantaneous water heaters.

Instantaneous water heaters heat up water at the time that hot water is required. For its operation it is necessary to have a water supply with an appropriate pressure.
Storage water heaters have a tank where water is kept hot and ready for the moment it is required. They have more flexibility for different water flow rates, as water temperature can be regulated at the point of use by mixing hot an cold water. They can operate even with a very low water pressure.

The U venting or vertical venting is an installation option for Direct-Vent heaters available in 3000 and 5000 kcal/h models when the heater must be installed on an internal wall. In this option, an adapting box is used to transform the original horizontal venting connections of the heater into 2 vertical 3″-diameter ducts, side by side, that must go through the roof and fitted on the outside with 2 caps that are supplied with the appliance. The maximum height of the ducts is 6 m. The flue gas duct must be 15 cm higher than inlet air duct.

It is a working mode for Direct Vent Heaters with thermostat. It is a new system that minimizes the noises produced by the combustion chamber, ensuring a quiet and safe sleep.

Heaters with thermostat have a temperature selection knob to choose the desired room temperature. In Direct-Vent heaters, the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shut off and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.
In Vent-Free heaters the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shifted to its minimum Power and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.

Yes, all of our heaters are provided with the Multigas System, i.e., the heaters are shipped to work with Natural Gas, but they are supplied with a kit for their conversions to LPG.

Direct-Vent and natural draft heaters don not produce any humidity, since their combustion gases are evacuated to the outside. They may even decrease the room relative humidity. Vent-Free heaters expel the combustion gases (including water vapor) to the room, so, in cases where there is not an appropriate permanent ventilation of the room, humidity may increase and even produce condensations.

Yes, as resins and thinners are used in their manufacture, they may be vaporized when heated up for the first time after being installed. It is recommended to provide room ventilation for about half an hour to eliminate any odor that may be produced.

Yes. Like all gas appliances, a periodic control of their working conditions and safety devices is recommended, preferably, at the beginning of the winter season.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) the MXP System which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, the MXP System automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) its ODS (Oxygen Depletion System) which, on detecting an oxygen decrease of 2 or 3% in the room air, it automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, too.

NO. All of our heaters require a minimum distance (stated in their manuals) between their bottoms and the floor. This is due to two reasons. First, to avoid high temperatures on the floor and second, as they are appliances that heat the room air by convection, they need to have an easy circulation of the air from the bottom to the upper part.

Vent-free heaters take the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air and, at the same time, they expel the combustion gases to the room. Therefore, they must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Natural Draft heaters require a chimney to draw the combustion gases toward the outside, so they also use the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air. They must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms either. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Direct-Vent heaters have a venting system that takes the air they need for combustion from the outside and, at the same time, it expels the combustion gases to the outside. Consequently, they can be installed in any kind of rooms, including bathrooms and bedrooms.

+ Heating

The U venting or vertical venting is an installation option for Direct-Vent heaters available in 3000 and 5000 kcal/h models when the heater must be installed on an internal wall. In this option, an adapting box is used to transform the original horizontal venting connections of the heater into 2 vertical 3″-diameter ducts, side by side, that must go through the roof and fitted on the outside with 2 caps that are supplied with the appliance. The maximum height of the ducts is 6 m. The flue gas duct must be 15 cm higher than inlet air duct.

It is a working mode for Direct Vent Heaters with thermostat. It is a new system that minimizes the noises produced by the combustion chamber, ensuring a quiet and safe sleep.

Heaters with thermostat have a temperature selection knob to choose the desired room temperature. In Direct-Vent heaters, the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shut off and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.
In Vent-Free heaters the burner keeps working at its maximum power until the selected room temperature is reached. At that moment, the burner is automatically shifted to its minimum Power and will remain so until the room temperature decreases a few degrees. Then, the burner starts working again at its maximum power and so on.

Yes, all of our heaters are provided with the Multigas System, i.e., the heaters are shipped to work with Natural Gas, but they are supplied with a kit for their conversions to LPG.

Direct-Vent and natural draft heaters don not produce any humidity, since their combustion gases are evacuated to the outside. They may even decrease the room relative humidity. Vent-Free heaters expel the combustion gases (including water vapor) to the room, so, in cases where there is not an appropriate permanent ventilation of the room, humidity may increase and even produce condensations.

Yes, as resins and thinners are used in their manufacture, they may be vaporized when heated up for the first time after being installed. It is recommended to provide room ventilation for about half an hour to eliminate any odor that may be produced.

Yes. Like all gas appliances, a periodic control of their working conditions and safety devices is recommended, preferably, at the beginning of the winter season.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) the MXP System which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, the MXP System automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room.

Yes, because they have a Double Safety System: 1) the gas safety valve which, in the absence of flame, automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater in a few seconds, and 2) its ODS (Oxygen Depletion System) which, on detecting an oxygen decrease of 2 or 3% in the room air, it automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, too.

NO. All of our heaters require a minimum distance (stated in their manuals) between their bottoms and the floor. This is due to two reasons. First, to avoid high temperatures on the floor and second, as they are appliances that heat the room air by convection, they need to have an easy circulation of the air from the bottom to the upper part.

Vent-free heaters take the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air and, at the same time, they expel the combustion gases to the room. Therefore, they must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Natural Draft heaters require a chimney to draw the combustion gases toward the outside, so they also use the oxygen they need for combustion from the room air. They must not be installed in bathrooms or bedrooms either. The rooms where they can be installed must have the permanent ventilation to the outside prescribed by local regulations.
Direct-Vent heaters have a venting system that takes the air they need for combustion from the outside and, at the same time, it expels the combustion gases to the outside. Consequently, they can be installed in any kind of rooms, including bathrooms and bedrooms.

+ Hot Water

Yes. Like any gas appliance, a periodic maintenance control is necessary. For water heaters, a monthly water drain (about 20 liters) should be made to remove the sediments deposited on the tank bottom. Water heaters are fitted with a magnesium anode to prevent corrosion of the tank. At least, once a year the anode condition should be checked and substituted if necessary.

Yes. They are available for natural gas and for LPG. On installing the appliance check that it corresponds to the type of gas you are going to use.

When using pressurizing pumps, the water volume increase produced by the temperature rise of the water in the tank must be taken into account. Many pressurizing pumps are fitted with a stop valve which will not allow such volume increase and, consequently the pressure inside the tank will become higher and may cause water leakages through the relief valve fitted in the appliance water connections. In that case, an expansion tank should be installed in the water supply between the pump and the water heater.
On the other hand, pressurizing pumps produce an important flow rate increase which may reduce the water heater capabilities. In that case, the flow rate should be reduced by adjusting the stopcock located just before the cold water inlet of the water heater.

High recovery storage water heaters have a safety system which, by means of heat sensitive device, the correct evacuation of the flue gases to the outside is constantly checked. In case of an abnormal counterflow of flue gases in the venting system, for example, because of an obstruction in the chimney, this system automatically cuts off the gas supply to the heater, thus avoiding a spillage of flue gases toward the room to prevent accidents due to carbon monoxide.
In our Acquapiú series of storage water heaters this system is named MXP.

In our local market all storage water heaters are of the Natural Draft type. Therefore, they must be connected to a chimney. In the case of our series Acquapiú of storage water heaters, their chimneys must end above the building top, since their input powers are above 10000 kcal/hour.

Usually, it can be substituted. But it is important to take into account that high recovery storage water heaters, because of their higher burner power, require a larger chimney diameter and an appropriate gas supply.

Recovery is a measurement of the capacity of a storage water heater to supply hot water. It stands for the volume of water that can be obtained in an hour with a temperature rise of 20°C between the input cold water and the output hot water.

Standard storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the volume of their accumulated water. Their burners have a rather low power, so their heating up times are quite long
High Recovery storage water heaters base their capability to supply hot water on the high power of their burners, practically regardless the volume of their accumulated water. As their heating up times are actually short, their performance is similar to that of instantaneous water heaters.

+ Boilers

Yes, and the heating circuit should be complete (when radiators are used, all of them have to be installed). It is a closed circuit that must be fully filled with water and any remaining air must be vented. For an optimum performance, water should be pressurized from 1 to 1.2 Kg/cm2.

It is a system to control the operation of boilers by means of which, on detecting any failure, the boiler is blocked, a beeper sounds and a failure code is displayed at the control panel to identify the detected problem. For example, lack of water pressure, lack of gas, malfunctioning of blower, etc.

Yes, they need it to feed the water pump, the electronic controls and, in Forced Balanced Draft Boilers, also for the blower.

Wall Hung Boilers can also be classified according to the type vent they have for flue gases. They are Natural Draft when they use a vertical duct to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the room air. They are Forced Balanced Draft when they have two vent ducts, one to evacuate the flue gases to the outside and another to take the necessary oxygen for combustion from the outside air.

Wall Hung Boilers can be classified according to the type of service they allow. Those identified as only heating allow the service only for heating through radiators or radiant floor, and those identified as double service allow both, heating through radiators or radiant floor and water heating for domestic use.